The Key to Performing Your Best in Sports

Single Rower In Sunrise

As you age, it becomes increasingly more difficult to execute certain motions, such as touching your toes, lifting objects, or raising your arms above your head. Mobility is a vital factor of your workout that most people leave out of their routines.

Even with Maureen’s history of athleticism, she discovered how Koko was the perfect system for maintaining and improving mobility. It helped her stay in shape for rowing, even after undergoing a few surgeries.

During my teens and early twenties I was not involved in organized athletics or committed to fitness. When I went to grad school many of my friends were engaged in fitness activities so I joined in with them.

Since that point I became more consistently invested in an active lifestyle, especially after starting to row in my early 30’s. I enjoyed the sport so much that for a number of years I was training and competing as a Master’s athlete.

The past ten years have been a little more difficult to maintain that level of commitment, as competing priorities and major health issues became [a concern].

A couple of years ago I realized that it was time to refocus on my health and Koko has been important to me returning to a stronger and healthier me. Yes, there have been some injuries/surgeries/travel that have caused some lapses in my consistency with Koko, but I always return.

The system is very user-friendly and I love the feedback. It is such an efficient program that it makes it easier to fit it into a busy lifestyle. Thank you Koko!

Maureen
Certified KokoNut

Staying active is a great way to keep weight down, maintain strength and increasing cardiovascular health.

Sports are the prime example of why training for mobility the way to stay limber, prepare your body for anything, which helps keep injuries at bay and allows you to play your best.

Stay Koko Strong!

Michael Wood, CSCS
Chief Fitness Officer, Koko FitClub


About Michael Wood, Chief Fitness Officer
Michael Wood, CSCS, is Chief Fitness Officer at Koko FitClub, driving the development of integrated strength and cardio training and nutrition programs for Koko members nationwide. A nationally acclaimed fitness expert, Michael has conducted research as a Senior Exercise Physiologist at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and has lectured at Boston University and the University of Connecticut. He has been named Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” Personal Trainer, and made the Men’s Journal “Dream Team” list of the nine best trainers in the U.S. Michael and his family live in North Attleboro, MA.

A Trick to Kicking Those Carbs at The Summer Cookouts

7.8 quinoa salad

Ah yes, the dreaded pasta salad. By far one of the best and easily-shoveled-into-your-mouth foods of July cookouts.

The downside of this dish is that it is loaded with trans fats and heavy carbs due to the large amount of mayonnaise and primarily pasta base. Too much of the pasta salad this summer can really knock you off course on your fitness journey.

Let’s replace that carb-heavy pasta with a grain superfood.

Quinoa has been around for thousands of years, is a tiny, high-protein grain from South America. According to Mary Sue Milliken from Food Network, it’s nicknamed the “wonder grain” because it cooks more quickly than rice, is virtually foolproof, and is lighter and more nutritious than other grains.

Here’s a zesty Summer Quinoa Salad recipe  that will go great with your burgers, but will stop your from packing on the pounds.

Ingredients
12 cups water
1 1/2 cups quinoa, rinsed
5 pickling cucumbers, peeled, ends trimmed, and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
1 small red onion, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
1 large tomato, cored, seeded, and diced
1 bunch Italian parsley leaves, chopped
2 bunches mint leaves, chopped
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 lemon, juiced
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 head endive, trimmed and separated into individual spears
1 avocado, peeled, seeded and diced, for garnish

Instructions
Bring the water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add the quinoa, stir once, and return to a boil. Cook uncovered, over medium heat for 12 minutes. Strain and rinse well with cold water, shaking the sieve well to remove all moisture.

When dry, transfer the quinoa to a large bowl. Add the cucumbers, onion, tomato, parsley, mint, olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt, and pepper and toss well. Spoon onto endive spears, top with avocado, and serve.

This will be a fan-favorite at your next cookout. You can also make a ton of it and save it for lunch or for snacks throughout the day, whether at work or having it in the cooler on the beach.

Kyle DeMarco
Managing Editor, The Stronger Blog

———————————————————-

Want to live the fitness lifestyle? Start with 30 days of individualized coaching and nutritional guidance that gets results. Try 30 days of Koko, just $30. Click the blue button below to get started…

GET 30 DAYS OF FITNESS FOR $30

3 Ways To Stay In Shape This Summer

So, you have officially eaten an entire pigs-worth of hot dogs and a full farm of burgers. Gotta love Fourth of July!

Now, you’re struck with the predicament of working all of that back off so you can continue to look amazing in your bathing suit when you’re off to the beach.

Getting your regular gym sessions in with Koko is always a given recommendation, but there are ways you can expedite that extra weight loss and make your summer better at the same time!

Here are 3 easy ways to stay fit and healthy this summer (post cookouts).

HIKING AND EXPLORING
A Kokonut fan-favorite is hiking and random outdoorsy excursions. What’s better than getting bunch of friends or family members together, picking out a new hiking spot on a map, and conquering it together!

cook-whitney-koko-1_SMNot only is hiking a great way to explore and get in touch with nature, flat land hiking burns as much as 400-500 calories per hour. Uphill you can burn over 600 per hour. Of course this depends on your average weight as well, but natural terrain is the best way to really get your heart and muscles working. An hour of rock climbing can make you burn over 1000 calories.

These easy outdoor activities are also some of the best ways to work your quads, hamstrings, and calves. Uphill hiking and climbing are also amazing chest, forearm, and shoulder exercises.

Treadmills and ellipticals? Forget it. Go climb some mountains.

FARMER’S MARKETS
‘Tis the season to take advantage of the fresh growing season and exploring your local town’s farmer’s market or locally grown produce stores.

You can stack your breakfasts with fresh fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries all of which are high in Vitamin C and antioxidants. And you can hoard good carbs for before the gym by getting fresh apples, peaches, banana, and plums.7.21 summer coahcing nutrition

The best part about farmer’s markets (besides how fresh the produce is) is that they are – for the most part – void of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, insecticides, and artificial fertilizers.

You may even find some freshly butchered meat at some as well, for all you carnivores out there.

PICK-UP SPORTS

When was the last time you played a sport? Kicked around a soccer ball with the kids? Or shot some baskets with a buddy?

The only way to keep yourself healthy, fit, and happy, is to stay active. Don’t fall victim to leftovers and Harry Potter marathons on TV. Get up, get out, and play.

Pick-up games with a bunch of others are a good way to incite mass fitness sessions! Soccer itself can help men burn around 800+ calories (700+ for women), and that is only an hour of playing.

A solid competitive basketball game is actually a great way to work your body in all different ways while burning calories… Up to 900 calories to be exact. The varying movements needed to play a good game of basketball keeps your muscles guessing and allows them to develop in more ways than one.

As long as you are out and enjoying the sun and doing something, that is living a healthy lifestyle. Everyone has a favorite activity, find a crew and do it together for that extra motivation.

Stay Koko Strong.

Kyle DeMarco
Managing Editor, The Stronger Blog

———————————————————-

Want to live the fitness lifestyle? Start with 30 days of individualized coaching and nutritional guidance that gets results. Try 30 days of Koko, just $30. Click the blue button below to get started…

GET 30 DAYS OF FITNESS FOR $30

We Are Going to Make Dinner Great Again

MAKEDINNERHEALTHYBLOG.png

Ah finally, you’re commuting back after a long day of work and you just can’t wait to kick those work pants off and be home.

But wait, you don’t know what you’re having for dinner! Queue the mad rush to figure out what you have in the pantry and what you can make in the least amount of time possible.

Quick and healthy don’t always coincide with each other. It’s typically one or the other. And to quote Shakespeare, “Therein lies the rub.”

So what do we do about this?

Cut out those preservative-rich ready-meals, get rid of the carb-loaded pasta dishes, and move over fatty fried take out. There’s a new meal in town.

Here is a wonderful (and easy) stir fry recipe that will satisfy your craving for salty soy sauce, but in a way that won’t pack on the pounds.

Simple and Healthy Chicken Stir-Fry

Ingredients
Sauce
Water
Soy Sauce
Red Wine (we recommend Cabernet Sauvignon)
2 tbspn white flour

Stir Fry
4 Whole peeled carrots
3 Broccoli crowns
1 onion
2 garlic cloves
½ lbs chicken breast
Salt
Pepper

‘Noodles’
1 bundle of bok choy
soy sauce

Instructions
Prep your chicken breast and clean it. Slice into thin strips and season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

Chop up your broccoli, carrots, onions, and garlic gloves. Heat 2 tbsp’s of olive oil in a large skillet and put in the carrots. Cook the carrots on high for 5 minutes. Add the remaining vegetables. Season with salt, pepper, and spices of your choice.  Turn the heat up high and stir occasionally for 5-10minutes. Add your sliced chicken. Cook until slightly brown.

Combine ¼ cup of water, ¼ cup of red wine, and 3 tbsp’s of soy sauce. Pour into skillet and reduce on medium heat. You may add more soy sauce or less depending on preference. Add 2 tbsp’s of flour as a thickening agent. Cook until everything has married and alcohol has reduced.

Take your bok choy and slice it thin and long (to create bok choy ‘noodles’). Place these in a boiling pot with a ½ cup of water and splash of soy sauce. Bring to a boil until bok choy is tender but not soggy. Drain and place on a dish. Spoon stir fry mixture over the bok choy. Enjoy!

The best part about this is that the bigger skillet, the more you can make and save for later. Kill 3 dinners with one stove!

 

Michael Wood, CSCS
Chief Fitness Officer, Koko FitClub


Interested in Koko?
Try 30 days of complete fitness and coaching for just $30.


GET 30 DAYS OF FITNESS FOR $30

About Michael Wood, Chief Fitness Officer
Michael Wood, CSCS, is Chief Fitness Officer at Koko FitClub, driving the development of integrated strength and cardio training and nutrition programs for Koko members nationwide. A nationally acclaimed fitness expert, Michael has conducted research as a Senior Exercise Physiologist at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and has lectured at Boston University and the University of Connecticut. He has been named Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” Personal Trainer, and made the Men’s Journal “Dream Team” list of the nine best trainers in the U.S. Michael and his family live in North Attleboro, MA.

6 Fundamental Human Movements

humanmovementblog

When I first started working out in high school, I had a dog-eared copy of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Bodybuilding for Men” that had been passed down through the years from one “in the know” senior to the next.

Like most people, I followed the instructions to the letter, splitting up my exercise by body part: chest one day, then legs, then arms, etc.

Bragging rights belonged to whoever had the biggest bench press, and everyone spent endless hours working the “show muscles” — biceps, chest, and abs — while mostly neglecting the “go muscles” — legs & back.

Continue reading